Company Organization Chart and Job Descriptions

Organization charts were created in the mid-1800s by the general manager of the Erie Railroad Company to properly delegate work. Organization charts; “Who is who?”, “How are the workflows?”, “How should the operation be?” plays a role in many issues. Organizational charts that mostly streamline the operation of the company are of two types;

This includes all activities of the company and the company receives scheme can vary depending on the actions presentations and charts used to be seen more clearly affairs reporting during. Organization charts reflect the work practices of an organization's culture. So what's the use?

  • It is important to make the decision processes clear.
  • It ensures that the works are carried out correctly and that they are delivered quickly.
  • It supports the company's change processes and creates a clear roadmap.
  • In order for these stages to become effective, organizational charts need to be put on paper. The most important question to be considered here is “How can we reach our goal faster if we manage this company?” should be.

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Parameters such as the levels of authority, the definition and extent of authorizations, and communication levels are not seen in the organizational charts, so additional tools are used and job descriptions are at the top of these. The job description is a document that shows what the employees do as a result of the analysis of a job, their bases and subordinates, their responsibilities, and their competencies to do the job. For this reason, establishing the organizational structure is very important in terms of company activities and performances. It is also vital for the internal functioning of the company. In today's conditions, businesses should create an organization and job descriptions that will realize the plans determined at the point of applying the selected policies and strategies. Successful implementation is highly dependent on organizational structure and job descriptions.

What is the Purpose of the Organization Chart?

In today's conditions, every company has its own policy and strategy. In order for the company to implement the strategy it has determined, it is necessary to design a well-structured organizational chart and job descriptions. This diagram clearly outlines the hierarchy within an organization and shows the relationships shared among each employee. These insights help employees understand who to report to and enable managers to appropriately delegate tasks and responsibilities between their teams. Organizations that use interactive and actionable organizational charts enjoy many more benefits that increase efficiency and facilitate communication.

 

Why are Job Descriptions Important?

Job descriptions help set and meet your expectations. A well-written job description will provide a solid basis for employers to communicate with their employees. Awareness of employee expectations also helps employers accurately assess performance. Job descriptions;

  • It clarifies the employer's expectations of the employee and provides a clear definition of the tasks that the employee will perform. This clarity creates employee motivation.
  • It provides clear reference points from which the employee's performance can be measured.
  • It ensures that payment and rating systems are structured logically and fairly.
  • It provides an impartial, authoritative reference tool for resolving issues, thus minimizing disagreements and arguments.
  • It provides the employer with structure and discipline to clarify and structure all work.
  • Identifies training and development areas.
  • It forms the basis of job postings so that suitable candidates can be attracted.
  • It forms the basis of interview questions that will help the employer identify the most suitable candidate and thus avoid an unsuccessful hire.

How Employee Motivation is impacted by Organizational Performance due to the Organizational Chart?

The organizational chart, traditionally viewed as a static representation of hierarchy, can be likened to a living organism that shapes the pulse of organizational performance and employee motivation.

Picture the chart not as a rigid structure but as a garden where roles and departments are dynamic, interconnected ecosystems.

In this paradigm, organizational performance is cultivated through an organic, collaborative growth process.

Instead of fixating on hierarchical layers, imagine a network of roots and branches intertwining, creating a resilient and adaptable system that responds to the ever-changing landscape of the business environment.

This perspective encourages a holistic view, emphasizing the symbiotic relationship between each department and role, fostering a culture of mutual support and shared success.

In the realm of employee motivation, reimagine the organizational chart as a compass guiding individuals on a personalized journey of professional fulfillment.

Each role becomes a waypoint, not just in terms of tasks but as a milestone in the larger narrative of an employee's career.

The chart transforms into a motivational roadmap, enabling employees to navigate their growth trajectory autonomously.

By decentralizing the traditional hierarchical model and embracing a more fluid and responsive structure, organizations can tap into a wellspring of intrinsic motivation.

This approach views each employee as a protagonist in their career story, contributing not just to the organization's success but also crafting a meaningful and engaging narrative of their professional journey.

How to Prepare an Organization Chart?

Organizational charts (or hierarchy charts) graphically represent the structure of an organization. Its purpose is to demonstrate reporting relationships and chains of command within the organization. Employee names, titles, and job positions are often shown in boxes or circles with lines connecting them to other employees and departments. By looking at the company organizational chart, people can quickly understand how the organization is designed, the number of levels, and where each employee fits into the organization.

There is a big picture to be seen before preparing the company organizational chart. To complete this picture, the “What kind of structure should we design?” question must be answered. It would be a good practice to start from the management level while preparing the organizational chart. Here, after determining the roles, competencies, and responsibilities, it should be determined how the work will be distributed throughout the organization. Finally, it should be decided what kind of structure to work in. It should not be forgotten that the schemes are a living structure and should be renewed in parallel with the movements of the companies.

How are Job Descriptions Prepared?

Job descriptions are a useful, plain-language tool that explains the function and responsibilities of a position. It details who performs a job, how it will be completed, and the frequency and purpose of the job in relation to the organization's mission and goals. Job descriptions, which are created in harmony with the goals and processes of the institution, are one of the strategies that show the most effective results. Responsibilities should be fluent and understandable, written in clauses in a logical arrangement. Affiliated top managers, their subordinates if any, the name of the task, and the names that will reside in the place should be specified. Job descriptions should be reviewed occasionally for the company structure and updated when necessary. Job descriptions; Various reasons are used as a tool, such as setting salary levels, conducting performance reviews, clarifying duties, determining titles and pay grades, establishing reasonable compliance checks, and hiring.

 

Who Prepares Job Descriptions?

Job descriptions; Prepared for career planning, education, and legal requirements. A job description provides an employee with a clear and concise resource to use as a guide for job performance. Same way; a supervisor can use the job description as a measurement tool to ensure that the employee meets job expectations. The person who best applies the job descriptions prepares it. It should write down the daily, weekly, and monthly tasks of the person performing the task. These job descriptions written by the employee must be approved by senior managers and HR. It is very important to prepare a definition according to the job, not the person, because people may be temporary, but tasks are permanent.

How to Prepare an Organization Chart?

Organizational charts (or hierarchy charts) graphically represent the structure of an organization. Its purpose is to demonstrate reporting relationships and chains of command within the organization. Employee names, titles, and job positions are often shown in boxes or circles with lines connecting them to other employees and departments. By looking at the company organizational chart, people can quickly understand how the organization is designed, the number of levels, and where each employee fits into the organization.

There is a big picture to be seen before preparing the company organizational chart. To complete this picture, the “What kind of structure should we design?” question must be answered. It would be a good practice to start from the management level while preparing the organizational chart. Here, after determining the roles, competencies, and responsibilities, it should be determined how the work will be distributed throughout the organization. Finally, it should be decided what kind of structure to work in. It should not be forgotten that the schemes are a living structure and should be renewed in parallel with the movements of the companies.

Organization Chart Example

When creating an organizational chart, it would be best to start from the management level. A general manager at the top, if any, department managers (such as human resources management, marketing, sales, and finance management) can be created, then an organizational chart descending to their sub-units. This flow will enable all processes to be shaped more fluently and to be more understandable.

For example; an assistant manager falls directly under a manager on the organizational chart, which indicates that the assistant manager reports to the manager. Organizational charts can take several forms;

Hierarchical Organization Chart

The most common model, the hierarchical organization chart, places the highest-ranking individuals at the top of the graph and positions the lower-ranking individuals below them.

Flat Organization Chart

The flat organizational chart, also known as the "horizontal" chart, places individuals at the same level, providing greater equality of power and autonomous decision-making ability than employees in hierarchical businesses.

Matrix Organization Chart

This complex organizational structure groups individuals according to their common skills, the departments they work for, and the people they can report to.

 

Job Description Examples

Job descriptions can be given as an example from a recruiter's job description. First of all, the position must have credentials;

Corporate Title: Specialist

Operational Title: Recruitment Specialist

Institutional Position: Recruitment Department

Location: Head Office

Aces: Assistant Recruitment Specialist

Secondly, the institutional role of the job description and lastly the area of ​​responsibility of the position should be specified. We, as Albert Solino, separate the competencies within themselves in the part we refer to as duties and competencies;

  • Core competencies
  • Functional competencies
  • Administrative competencies In

Let's investigate some common job descriptions:

 

  1. Software Engineer:

    • Job Description: Software Engineers are responsible for designing, developing, and maintaining software applications. They use their core competencies in programming languages, problem-solving, and algorithm design to create efficient and reliable code. Functionally, they engage in software development, debugging, and code optimization. In a managerial capacity, they collaborate with teams, manage projects, and apply agile methodologies for efficient development processes.
    • Core Competencies: Programming languages, problem-solving, algorithm design.
    • Functional Competencies: Software development, debugging, code optimization.
    • Managerial Competencies: Team collaboration, project management, agile methodologies.
  2. Digital Marketing Specialist:

    • Job Description: Digital Marketing Specialists focus on promoting products or services through online channels. Core competencies include social media management, SEO, and data analysis. They functionally engage in content creation, email marketing, and e-mail marketing campaign optimization. Managerially, they develop marketing strategies, manage budgets, and interpret analytics to drive effective digital campaigns.
    • Core Competencies: Social media management, SEO, data analysis.
    • Functional Competencies: Content creation, email marketing, campaign optimization.
    • Managerial Competencies: Marketing strategy, budget management, analytics interpretation.
  3. Human Resources Generalist:

    • Job Description: Human Resources Generalists play a key role in managing employee relations. Core competencies include expertise in HR policies and conflict resolution. Functionally, they handle recruitment, onboarding, and performance management. Managerially, they provide leadership, engage in strategic planning, and contribute to organizational development initiatives.
    • Core Competencies: Employee relations, HR policies, conflict resolution.
    • Functional Competencies: Recruitment, onboarding, performance management.
    • Managerial Competencies: Leadership, strategic planning, organizational development.
  4. Data Scientist:

    • Job Description: Data Scientists analyze and interpret complex data sets to inform business decision-making. Core competencies involve statistical analysis, machine learning, and data visualization. Functionally, they engage in data modeling, predictive analysis, and data-driven decision-making. In a managerial capacity, they lead projects, collaborate cross-functionally, and communicate findings effectively.
    • Core Competencies: Statistical analysis, machine learning, data visualization.
    • Functional Competencies: Data modeling, predictive analysis, data-driven decision-making.
    • Managerial Competencies: Project leadership, cross-functional collaboration, communication.
  5. Customer Success Manager:

    • Job Description: Customer Success Managers focus on ensuring customer satisfaction and loyalty. Core competencies include customer service, relationship management, and communication. Functionally, they handle customer onboarding, account management, and issue resolution. Managerially, they coordinate teams, ensuring customer satisfaction and analyzing feedback.
    • Core Competencies: Customer service, relationship management, communication.
    • Functional Competencies: Customer onboarding, account management, issue resolution.
    • Managerial Competencies: Customer satisfaction, team coordination, feedback analysis.
  6. Financial Analyst:

    • Job Description: Financial Analysts analyze financial data to support strategic decision-making. Core competencies include financial modeling, data analysis, and attention to detail. Functionally, they engage in budgeting, forecasting, and financial reporting. Managerially, they contribute to strategic planning, risk management, and financial decision-making.
    • Core Competencies: Financial modeling, data analysis, attention to detail.
    • Functional Competencies: Budgeting, forecasting, financial reporting.
    • Managerial Competencies: Strategic planning, risk management, financial decision-making.
  7. UX/UI Designer:

    • Job Description: UX/UI Designers focus on creating user-friendly and visually appealing interfaces. Core competencies include user research, wireframing, and prototyping. Functionally, they engage in interface design, usability testing, and design thinking. In a managerial capacity, they collaborate with teams, manage projects, and provide design leadership.
    • Core Competencies: User research, wireframing, prototyping.
    • Functional Competencies: Interface design, usability testing, design thinking.
    • Managerial Competencies: Collaboration, project management, design leadership.
  8. Content Writer:

    • Job Description: Content Writers are responsible for creating engaging and relevant written content. Core competencies include writing, editing, and storytelling. Functionally, they engage in content creation, SEO optimization, and research. Managerially, they contribute to content strategy, editorial planning, and maintaining brand voice consistency.
    • Core Competencies: Writing, editing, storytelling.
    • Functional Competencies: Content creation, SEO optimization, research.
    • Managerial Competencies: Content strategy, editorial planning, brand voice consistency.
  9. Network Administrator:

    • Job Description: Network Administrators manage and maintain an organization's computer networks. Core competencies include network security, troubleshooting, and infrastructure management. Functionally, they engage in system monitoring, hardware configuration, and network optimization. Managerially, they oversee IT governance, coordinate teams, and promote cybersecurity awareness.
    • Core Competencies: Network security, troubleshooting, infrastructure management.
    • Functional Competencies: System monitoring, hardware configuration, network optimization.
    • Managerial Competencies: IT governance, team coordination, cybersecurity awareness.
  10. Sales Representative:

    • Job Description: Sales Representatives focus on selling products or services to potential customers. Core competencies include communication, persuasion, and relationship building. Functionally, they engage in sales prospecting, product knowledge, and negotiation. In a managerial capacity, they contribute to sales strategy, pipeline management, and customer relationship management (CRM).
    • Core Competencies: Communication, persuasion, relationship building.
    • Functional Competencies: Sales prospecting, product knowledge, negotiation.
    • Managerial Competencies: Sales strategy, pipeline management, customer relationship management (CRM).
  11. Project Manager:

    • Job Description: Project Managers oversee and coordinate projects from initiation to completion. Core competencies include leadership, communication, and problem-solving. Functionally, they engage in project planning, risk management, and resource allocation. Managerially, they provide team leadership, manage stakeholders, and ensure successful project delivery.
    • Core Competencies: Leadership, communication, problem-solving.
    • Functional Competencies: Project planning, risk management, resource allocation.
    • Managerial Competencies: Team leadership, stakeholder management, project delivery.
  12. Health and Safety Officer:

    • Job Description: Health and Safety Officers focus on creating and maintaining a safe work environment. Core competencies include risk assessment, regulatory compliance, and emergency response. Functionally, they engage in safety training, incident investigation, and hazard identification. Managerially, they contribute to policy development, promote safety culture, and conduct audits.
    • Core Competencies: Risk assessment, regulatory compliance, emergency response.
    • Functional Competencies: Safety training, incident investigation, hazard identification.
    • Managerial Competencies: Policy development, safety culture promotion, audits.
  13. Business Analyst:

    • Job Description: Business Analysts analyze business processes and systems to drive improvements. Core competencies include data analysis, business process modeling, and requirements gathering. Functionally, they engage in system analysis, market research, and feasibility studies. Managerially, they contribute to project coordination, stakeholder management, and alignment with business strategy.
    • Core Competencies: Data analysis, business process modeling, requirements gathering.
    • Functional Competencies: System analysis, market research, feasibility studies.
    • Managerial Competencies: Project coordination, stakeholder management, business strategy alignment.
  14. Graphic Designer:

    • Job Description: Graphic Designers create visual content for various mediums. Core competencies include creativity, visual communication, and design software proficiency. Functionally, they engage in branding, illustration, and multimedia design. In a managerial capacity, they collaborate with clients, manage projects, and ensure design quality control.
    • Core Competencies: Creativity, visual communication, design software proficiency.
    • Functional Competencies: Branding, illustration, multimedia design.
    • Managerial Competencies: Client collaboration, project management, design quality control.
  15. DevOps Engineer:

    • Job Description: DevOps Engineers focus on automating and streamlining IT operations. Core competencies include automation, system administration, and scripting. Functionally, they engage in continuous integration/continuous deployment (CI/CD), infrastructure as code, and cloud services. Managerially, they collaborate, resolve problems, and manage release processes effectively.
    • Core Competencies: Automation, system administration, scripting.
    • Functional Competencies: Continuous integration/continuous deployment (CI/CD), infrastructure as code, cloud services.
    • Managerial Competencies: Collaboration, problem resolution, release management.